7 must-see sights in north Norfolk

Seals at Blakeney Point in front of the Lifeboat House. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

Blakeney Point is home to England's largest grey seal colony. - Credit: © ARCHANT NORFOLK PHOTOGRAPHIC

From a historic pier to the home of England's largest colony of grey seals, north Norfolk possesses an array of historic and memorable things to see and do.

To help you choose, here are seven must-see things you can't miss in north Norfolk.

Cromer pier, very quiet the morning storm Eunice is due to hit Rainbow appears on the horizon.. Pic

Cromer Pier is a popular destination among travellers visiting north Norfolk. - Credit: Brittany Woodman

1. Cromer Pier

Home to the UK's only remaining traditional end of the pier variety show, Cromer's renowned pier is a major attraction.

A pier or jetty has stood in Cromer since 1391 but its current iteration opened in 1901 and cost £17,000 to build.

The 500ft iron structure is home to the Pavilion Theatre, bar, gift shop and Tides restaurant and is a popular attraction among visitors to the town.


Holkham Hall, at the heart of the massive estate twice the size of Norwich which is owned by Thomas

The 18th century mansion Holkham Hall possesses rich history. - Credit: Ian Burt

2. Holkham Hall

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Set within a 25,000 acre estate on the north Norfolk coast, Holkham Hall is surrounded by rolling parkland which is home to fallow deer, as well as a range of landmarks.

The 18th century mansion possesses rich history and architecture and is full of interesting heritage.

Holkham Hall is open to visitors from March until the end of October.


One of the beach huts on Wells beach. Picture: Danielle Booden

One of the beach huts on Wells beach. Picture: Danielle Booden - Credit: Danielle Booden

3. Beach huts at Wells

Renowned for its bright seaside colours, Wells' beach huts feature many unique paintings, postcards and photos.

Although mostly privately owned, the huts can be admired along a walk on the beach, however, there are some which can be booked with accommodation or separately if visiting for the day. 


Seals at Blakeney Point in front of the Lifeboat House. PHOTO: ANTONY KELLY

Blakeney Point is home to England's largest grey seal colony. - Credit: © ARCHANT NORFOLK PHOTOGRAPHIC

4. Seals at Blakeney

Blakeney Point is home to England's largest grey seal colony and many summer breeding birds.

Visitors wishing to see the seals up close can book a trip on one of the locally operated trips that leave from Morston Quay.


The North Norfolk Railway line which runs from Sheringham to Holt. Photo: Ian Burt

The North Norfolk Railway runs between Sheringham and Holt. - Credit: IAN BURT

5. North Norfolk Railway

Running between Sheringham and Holt, the North Norfolk Railway takes in unique views of the county's coastline and countryside.

Having first opened in 1887, the railway had originally been built to exploit the rapidly growing tourist market instead of serving local communities.

Today, the railway offers a range of activities such as a steam driver, diesel driver and signalling experience days.


The rufous bush chat, which is more commonly found in south-eastern Europe, made its way to the mars

Stiffkey Saltmarshes offer an interesting sight of twisting muddy creeks flooded by the daily tide. - Credit: Archant

6. Saltmarshes

North Norfolk is renowned for its saltmarshes which can be found along the coast between Holme and Salthouse. 

With expansive horizons, Stiffkey Saltmarshes make up part of Blakeney National Nature Reserve and offer an interesting sight of twisting muddy creeks flooded by the daily tide.


North Norfolk boasts four Blue Flag beaches at Cromer, Mundesley, Sea Palling and Sheringham, as wel

North Norfolk is home to six blue flag beaches. - Credit: ALLY McGILVRAY

7. Blue Flag beaches 

North Norfolk is considered one of the best stretches of sandy coasts in the United Kingdom. 

Six beaches in north Norfolk have been awarded prestigious Blue Flags: Cromer, East Runton, Mundesley, Sea Palling, Sheringham and West Runton.

In order for a beach to be regarded as a Blue Flag, beaches must have a high water quality, access to facilities, environmental education and management, as well as high levels of cleanliness and safety.