Aylsham food festival organisers celebrate event’s success

Richard Hughesand his wife Stacia Briggs enjoyed a supper prepared, cooked and served by students at

Richard Hughesand his wife Stacia Briggs enjoyed a supper prepared, cooked and served by students at Aylsham High School. Photo: Slow Food Aylsham - Credit: Archant

The organisers of a slow food festival in north Norfolk have described the event as a big success, with a few hundred guests enjoying locally sourced food and entertainment.

Richard Hughes and his wife, Stacia Briggs, with Slow Food Aylsham chairman Patrick Prekopp. Richard

Richard Hughes and his wife, Stacia Briggs, with Slow Food Aylsham chairman Patrick Prekopp. Richard and Stacia entertained some 60 diners after the meal with anectdotes about Richard's career in hospitality and catering. Photo: Slow Food Aylsham - Credit: Archant

The organisers of a slow food festival in north Norfolk have described the event as a big success, with a few hundred guests enjoying locally sourced food and entertainment.

Organised by the town's slow food movement, the Aylsham Food Festival is now in its 12th year and this year offered events over the course of four days.

Chairman of Slow Food Aylsham, Patrick Prekopp, said: 'We've had a few hundred people attend and it's gone really well.'

'We had a good turnout regardless of the rain and we've had a fun day with the showcase.'

Local chef Derrol Waller demonstrated his cookery skills on at the festival showcase on Saturday, Oc

Local chef Derrol Waller demonstrated his cookery skills on at the festival showcase on Saturday, October 6. Photo: Slow Food Aylsham - Credit: Archant


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The festival began on Friday, September 28, with a 'Cider with Rosie' style class on the art of cider making with demonstrations by Rosie and David Warren.

On Friday, October 5, the festival hosted 'An Evening with Richard Hughes' at Aylsham High School, which included a supper cooked by Aylsham High School students, and a 50 minute question and answer session with the chef.

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Slow Food Aylsham treasurer Roger Willis said: 'We had the supper at Aylsham High School prepared by the students, who cooked steak and ale pie and seasonal vegetables, followed by an apple charlotte.'

He added: 'All the ingredients were as local as possible, with beef from the local butchers and apples from Aylsham orchards.

The Banana Ukulele Band entertained at the festival's showcase on Saturday, October 6. Photo: Slow F

The Banana Ukulele Band entertained at the festival's showcase on Saturday, October 6. Photo: Slow Food Aylsham - Credit: Archant

'We had about 60 guests attend.'

On Saturday, October 6, the festival showcase was held in the market place and town hall with free entry to the cookery demonstrations, food stalls, and the Banana Ukulele Band between 9am to 1pm.

Mr Willis added: 'We had to hold it all in the town hall due to the weather but normally we have some outside.

'We had the Banana Ukelele Band play in the market place until the rain got too bad.'

The Banana Ukulele Band who entertained at the festival's showcase on Saturday, October 6. Photo: Sl

The Banana Ukulele Band who entertained at the festival's showcase on Saturday, October 6. Photo: Slow Food Aylsham - Credit: Archant

The festival will also include a sold out wine tasting evening held on Saturday, October 6.

And the festival will wrap up on Sunday, October 7, with the Big Slow Brunch in Aylsham town hall, with table magician Robbie James performing magic tricks.

Slow Food Aylsham was founded in 2009 as a part of the slow food movement.

The annual food festival is the group's showcase event where they work with producers, chefs and businesses to help promote locally grown food.

One of the dishes prepared by Derrol Waller, a warm apple and cheese salad. Photo: Slow Food Aylsham

One of the dishes prepared by Derrol Waller, a warm apple and cheese salad. Photo: Slow Food Aylsham - Credit: Archant

For more information about the events, visit the group's website.

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