Football pitch shelter knocked over storm

A stand at Cromer's Cabbell Road football ground has blown over in stormy conditions. 

A stand at Cromer's Cabbell Road football ground has blown over in stormy conditions. - Credit: Neil Perry

Storm weather has claimed a football club’s beloved shelter.

The structure at Cabbell Road ground in Cromer, which bears the sign of Cromer Football Club, collapsed after Storm Eunice on Friday. 

Jenna Bedwell, the club’s chairman, said the shelter had been built around 24 years ago by former general manager Richard Cook, so its loss was distressing for the club.

She said: “Long-standing committee member Steve Wones remembers being there and helping to paint the shelter.
“It’s quite sad to lose something that is part of our history, we would love for it to have remained standing until we move to a new ground.” 

The club is planning to shift to a new ground over the next few years, but the details of where and when have not yet been confirmed. 

Ms Bedwell said she hoped the shelter could be replaced, but it was uncertain how this could be carried out as North Norfolk District Council owned the site and it was run by Everyone Active. 

Cabbell Park Football Ground, home of Cromer Football Club. Picture: MARK BULLIMORE

File photo of the stand at Cabbell Park Football Ground, home of Cromer Football Club, which has blown over in the recent storms. - Credit: Archant

A stand at Cromer's Cabbell Road football ground has blown over in stormy conditions. 

A stand at Cromer's Cabbell Road football ground has blown over in stormy conditions. - Credit: Neil Perry

A stand at Cromer's Cabbell Road football ground has blown over in stormy conditions. 

A stand at Cromer's Cabbell Road football ground has blown over in stormy conditions. - Credit: Neil Perry

A stand at Cromer's Cabbell Road football ground has blown over in stormy conditions. 

A stand at Cromer's Cabbell Road football ground has blown over in stormy conditions. - Credit: Neil Perry

North Norfolk’s coastline has avoided the battering it has taken in some previous storms due to the direction of the current winds. 

A North Norfolk District Council spokesman said flood gates would remain closed on Monday evening, and flood wardens were monitoring the coast and rivers. 

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North Norfolk's country parks will remain closed until further notice while countryside rangers clear the park of debris and fallen trees.

The council said a report from Anglian Water suggested that there is overflow in Mundesley which may affect bathing water quality.

Storms Dudley and Eunice came from the south-west meaning parts of south Wales and south-west England were worst hit, although a rare red weather warning was also issued for Suffolk ahead of Storm Eunice.

The storm which has hit Norfolk over the past 12 hours, named Franklin, is also approaching from a westerly and south-westerly direction.  

Cromer's deputy mayor Pat West.

Cromer's deputy mayor Pat West. - Credit: Supplied

Pat West, Cromer’s deputy mayor, said he and councillor Tim Adams had been called to a report of a bough that had fallen from a tree in the Davey Hill area, where the town’s cemetery is located, after Storm Eunice.

Cromer prom very quiet the morning storm Eunice is due to hit Rainbow appears on the horizon.. Pict

Cromer town centre has been quiet on the morning of Storm Eunice. - Credit: Brittany Woodman

The sea crashing into the esplanade at Cromer on Monday, after several days of high winds and stormy conditions. 

The sea crashing into the esplanade at Cromer on Monday, after several days of high winds and stormy conditions. - Credit: Neil Perry

The sea crashing into the esplanade at Cromer on Monday, after several days of high winds and stormy conditions. 

The sea crashing into the esplanade at Cromer on Monday, after several days of high winds and stormy conditions. - Credit: Neil Perry

The sea crashing into the esplanade at Cromer on Monday, after several days of high winds and stormy conditions. 

The sea crashing into the esplanade at Cromer on Monday, after several days of high winds and stormy conditions. - Credit: Neil Perry

He said: “Myself and councillor Adams went and removed it. But we’ve had nothing today - I think we’ve got away with it. 

“I’m quite surprised, but now the concern is that things are going to be weakened by all these winds. Things could potentially still be dangerous.”

Andrew Howse, from Garden Green Fingers tree surgeon and landscapers in Overstrand, said he had been called to a large willow tree that had fallen down near Wroxham. 

Mr Howse said: “Besides that it wasn’t as bad as I was expecting it to be. We’ve had more problems with fences and people’s sheds being blown over.”

A willow tree which was blown over near Wroxham during the recent storms. 

A willow tree which was blown over near Wroxham during the recent storms. - Credit: Garden Green Fingers

A willow tree which was blown over near Wroxham during the recent storms. 

A willow tree which was blown over near Wroxham during the recent storms. - Credit: Garden Green Fingers

A willow tree which was blown over near Wroxham during the recent storms. 

A willow tree which was blown over near Wroxham during the recent storms. - Credit: Garden Green Fingers

Other north Norfolk tree surgeons said the damage caused by the storms was relatively minor. 

Jack Fabb of J.A.F Tree Services, near Aylsham, said: “There have been a few (trees come down) but not really many in the Cromer area.
“I would say the ones that have come down, needed to come down anyway because they were rotten.”

Joe Dixon from Woodpecker Tree Services in North Walsham said: “There’s a few (trees) that have come down but considering the wind that we’ve had it hasn’t been too bad. 

“We’ve had quite a few storms over the past few years and that has thinned out all the trees that aren’t particularly good.

Although many train services in other parts of the country have been cancelled, services here, including the Bittern line from Sheringham to Norwich, are still running to schedule, although Greater Anglia has asked passengers to only make essential trips

Sheringham Lifeboat Station said: "Another blustery stormy day here on the North Norfolk coast as storm Franklin makes its way across the UK.

"The wind is currently gusting at around 45/55mph, remember to let away from the cliff edges and take care of you’re venturing out a long the promenades."