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Royal Norfolk Regiment steam locomotive nameplate presented

PUBLISHED: 14:42 15 March 2018 | UPDATED: 14:42 15 March 2018

Presentation of the third nameplate cast for The Royal Norfolk Regiment locomotive. Left to right, Neil Sharpe, Kate Thaxton, Brigadier Max Marriner, Dicky Bird and Peter Mayne.
Picture: ANTONY KELLY

Presentation of the third nameplate cast for The Royal Norfolk Regiment locomotive. Left to right, Neil Sharpe, Kate Thaxton, Brigadier Max Marriner, Dicky Bird and Peter Mayne. Picture: ANTONY KELLY

Archant Norfolk 2018

Everybody loves a steam train and a nameplate for a special locomotive will soon be an added attraction at a Norfolk museum.

Pictured with the locomotive, left to right, Neil Sharpe, Kate Thaxton, Brigadier Max Marriner, Dicky Bird and Peter Mayne. 
Picture: ANTONY KELLYPictured with the locomotive, left to right, Neil Sharpe, Kate Thaxton, Brigadier Max Marriner, Dicky Bird and Peter Mayne. Picture: ANTONY KELLY

Army and rail dignitaries joined museum staff at the presentation of the third nameplate cast for the Royal Norfolk Regiment steam locomotive, which runs on the North Norfolk Railway (NNR), at Weybourne station on Thursday, March 15.

The locomotive 90775 was the first mainline steam, diesel or electric locomotive to bear the highly appropriate name and honoured generations of soldiers who served in the Norfolks.

The third nameplate, cast at the same time as the two which adorn the 20 metres long and 133 tons locomotive, was presented to the Royal Norfolk Regimental Museum by the locomotive’s owner, the Midland and Great Northern (M&GN) Society.

The plate, which is 1.5 metres long and made of solid brass, is topped with the regimental crest of the Norfolks, Britannia.

It was mounted on a display board which records the naming of the locomotive last September, tells something of the life of the locomotive and shows where it can be seen in action on the NNR.

A special train, conveying guests in the comfort of the GW directors’ saloon, left Sheringham for Holt at midday, where it reversed to return with a stop at Weybourne for the presentation.

The party comprised Brigadier Max Marriner, county colonel of the Royal Anglians, who said: “The Norfolks have been one of the most important county regiments for 300 years, and many of the soldiers of the 1st Battalion, the Royal Anglian Regiment, based at Woolwich in London, still come from the county.

“This will embody the links between the regiment, the county and the railway.”

Dicky Bird, who has been working with the Royal Norfolk Regimental Museum since 1990, said: “Everyone has a love affair with steam trains. This will be something different for the museum.”

Museum curator Kate Thaxton was also on board and she said they were not sure whether the nameplate would go on show at Norwich Castle or at the Shirehall Museum in the city.


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