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Spitting Image will poke fun at all sides, Norfolk co-creator insists

PUBLISHED: 12:31 27 September 2020 | UPDATED: 12:38 27 September 2020

Roger Law made his name with the Spitting Image satire series on TV back in the 80's. Picture: Ian Burt

Roger Law made his name with the Spitting Image satire series on TV back in the 80's. Picture: Ian Burt

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Spitting Image’s comeback will lampoon all political sides, its Norfolk co-creator has said, but the ideology of Boris Johnson’s Government is “nuts”.

Puppet of Prime Minister Boris Johnson, created for the new series of Spitting Image, Picture: Mark Harrison/BritBox/Avalon/PA WirePuppet of Prime Minister Boris Johnson, created for the new series of Spitting Image, Picture: Mark Harrison/BritBox/Avalon/PA Wire

The satirical puppet show, which was watched by 15 million viewers in its heyday, is returning on subscription service BritBox.

Asked whether it will target right-wing figures only, co-creator Roger Law, who lives in Wells on the north Norfolk coast, replied: “No, that’s no fun.”

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The show, featuring new caricatures of the Prime Minister, Donald Trump, Kim Kardashian and Prince Harry and Meghan Markle among others, returns on October 3 with a 10-week series.

Melania Trump and US President Donald Trump in puppet form for the new series of Spitting Image. Picture: Mark Harrison/BritBox/Avalon/PA WireMelania Trump and US President Donald Trump in puppet form for the new series of Spitting Image. Picture: Mark Harrison/BritBox/Avalon/PA Wire

Images of the puppets have already caused some controversy with claims the show will be biased, while it also faced an online backlash after revealing a Greta Thunberg puppet.

“There’s lots of ammunition to throw at the other side as well. You go for them all,” Mr Law told The Andrew Marr Show.

But he said that the ideology of the current Government was “nuts”.

Roger Law has a studio in Wells. Picture: Ian BurtRoger Law has a studio in Wells. Picture: Ian Burt

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“When we started Spitting Image everything was in turmoil. There were riots in the streets.... and of course you had Thatcher.

“You start looking on Thatcher with nostalgia because at least you knew what she was about and what she was going to do, if you thought about it.

Likeness of Dominic Cummings, created for the new series of Spitting Image. Picture: Mark Harrison/BritBox/Avalon/PA WireLikeness of Dominic Cummings, created for the new series of Spitting Image. Picture: Mark Harrison/BritBox/Avalon/PA Wire

“Boris and the boys, you’ve got no idea, and the ideology is absolutely nuts,” he told the BBC One show.

The satirical show was one of the most-watched British shows of the 1980s and 1990s until it was cancelled in 1996, and was notable for the way it took aim at public figures.

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The 79-year-old previously said he wanted to resurrect the programme as a “public service satire” in response to the current state of politics.

Duke and Duchess of Sussex in puppet form for the new series of Spitting Image. Picture: Mark Harrison/BritBox/Avalon/PA WireDuke and Duchess of Sussex in puppet form for the new series of Spitting Image. Picture: Mark Harrison/BritBox/Avalon/PA Wire

He added: “You can’t really change anybody’s mind by shouting at them... but you can with humour.”

He said it was difficult for political figures and celebrities to say they hate their puppet alter-egos.

“If you’re English you can’t turn around and say, ‘I hate my puppet they’ve insulted me,”’ he said. “Take someone like (Michael) Gove. What we did with him is pretty disgusting... He was asked about it and he avoided the subject...

“They have to say they like it because it’s too difficult if you’re a Brit to say, ‘I’m really upset.”’


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