Sheringham school aims even higher

A north Norfolk head teacher, whose 'good' school has been praised by inspectors for its improvement, said he will not rest until it has become 'outstanding'.

A north Norfolk head teacher, whose 'good' school has been praised by inspectors for its improvement, said he will not rest until it has become 'outstanding'.

Sheringham High School and sixth form was rated 'good' - the second highest of the four gradings - in all of the key areas including achievement and personal development following an Ofsted inspection last month.

Only one recommendation has been made by the inspectors - who felt some students were not being challenged enough - but Tim Roderick, the school's head teacher, said he did not see that as a licence to sit back and relax.

He said: 'I was pleased there wasn't a big long list of things we need to do, but anybody who says we can do nothing now will go backwards. We know we want to improve. Next time we want to be outstanding.'


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The report made several references to the progress the school, which has 813 pupils, has made since its last inspection in January 2006 - when it was given an overall 'satisfactory' rating.

Achievement in maths and English was highlighted after the school's latest GCSE results showed the number of students gaining five or more A* to C grades, including those core subjects, was 11pc above the national average.

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Students were said to be well supported and felt safe, and inspectors believe the school's specialist arts college status 'extends their cultural horizons'.

In the 2006 report, concerns were raised about attendance levels - which had been below the national average for three years - and students were urged to make more of an effort to get to school.

But this time around the inspectors acknowledged an improvement now that attendance levels are in line with the rest of the country.

In a letter to students, Ian Seath, one of the inspectors who visited the school, congratulated them. He said: 'Your school has many strengths and one of them is you.'

Mr Roderick, who became head in September 2004, said the school was now oversubscribed which suggested it had become an attractive option for parents.

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