WATCH: Pigs root out Second World War bomb

Police and the army's bomb disposal unit attended a farm in Roughton after an unexploded mortar shell was found. 

Police and the army's bomb disposal unit attended a farm in Roughton after an unexploded mortar shell was found. - Credit: Simon Walls

Pigs have dug up a Second World War mortar round on a north Norfolk farm. 

Simon Walls said he was shocked at the discovery in a field off the A140 at Roughton, south of Cromer, which the army's bomb squad later came and blew up. 

Police and the army's bomb disposal unit attended a farm in Roughton after an unexploded mortar shell was found. 

Police and the army's bomb disposal unit attended a farm in Roughton after an unexploded mortar shell was found. - Credit: Simon Walls

Mr Walls said: "We were just clearing an electric fence ready to relocate some pigs, and one of guys stumbled across a mortar that was laying on the ground.

"The pigs had rooted it up and had been playing with it, and pushed it between two wires so they couldn't get to it anymore, so it was in 'no man's land'.

Police and the army's bomb disposal unit attended a farm in Roughton after an unexploded mortar shell was found. 

Police and the army's bomb disposal unit attended a farm in Roughton after an unexploded mortar shell was found. - Credit: Simon Walls

Mr Walls said police and then the bomb disposal team attended and cordoned off the area, before blowing up the Second World War-era bomb later that day (Friday, September 17).


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"It was fairly big, it had been defused so it was no immediate danger, but it was still full of TNT.

"It's amazing what the pigs can find. They love metal and playing with things, they're very inquisitive." 

The scene at the pig farm shortly before the army's bomb disposal uni

The scene at the pig farm shortly before the army's bomb disposal unit exploded a Second World War-era mortar round at a farm in Roughton. - Credit: Simon Walls

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A British Army spokesman said: "Upon inspection the item was found to be a Second World War-vintage mortar bomb and was safely detonated in situ.

"At no time was there any danger to local residents and we thank the public for their patience.

"We always advise the public that if they inadvertently disturb what they believe to be live ordnance, they should contact their local police force as a matter of urgency.”

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