Parents fight on to get children back

A couple fighting to get their children back after they were forcibly adopted amid abuse claims will not give up - even though their savings have been cleared out by the five-year battle.

A COUPLE fighting to get their children back after they were forcibly adopted amid abuse claims will not give up - even though their savings have been cleared out by the five-year battle.

Nicky and Mark Webster, of Cromer, said, despite signing a deal with The Mail on Sunday and receiving legal aid, attempts to unite the three children with their two-year-old brother Brandon have been financially draining.

Mr Webster said their extended family had helped out with money but all their savings were now wiped out.

Yet, the couple said they would not stop battling to get their children back.


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The Websters will speak to their legal team and could take their case to the House of Lords or even the European Courts of Justice.

Mrs Webster said they did not have the money necessary for that at the moment but she added: "As a large family, we will find the money somehow."

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In 2005 the couple's daughter and two sons were adopted after medical evidence suggested one of them had been physically abused - although experts now believe the injuries may have been the result of a vitamin deficiency.

The couple fled to Ireland, where Brandon was born, in 2006 fearing he would also be taken into care.

Mrs Webster said that trip, along with a subsequent five-month stay at a residential centre while their parenting was assessed, had contributed to costs totalling thousands of pounds.

The mother-of-four, who is expecting her fifth child in five weeks, said they had to pay rent during the council-organised assessment, during which her husband was unable to work, as well as paying bills back home in Cromer, where Mr Webster works at the Cromer Crab Company. "It was something we had to do in order to keep Brandon with us," she said.

Mrs Webster said they had been given some money by The Mail on Sunday and had received much-needed "practical" help.

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