Memorial plaque for former Norwich City writer stolen from tree

Pretty Corner, SheringhamFormer EDP journalist Bruce Robinson is co-author of a updated history of

Former EDP journalist Bruce Robinson - Credit: Archant Library

A civic society was left "disgusted" after a memorial plaque to a former EDP Norwich City writer was stolen from a churchyard. 

The memorial to Bruce Robinson, his father Frank and their family members Jesse Robinson and June Rudolph, was taken from a tree adjacent to a church path in Long Sutton on May 1. 

Mr Robinson, who died in 2016 at the age of 80, moved to Norfolk to write about Norwich City after beginning his journalism career in Lincolnshire. He became the assistant sports editor for the paper.

Bruce Robinson, sports writer and assistant sports editor, at the EDP, 20 August 1993. Picture: Arch

Bruce Robinson, sports writer and assistant sports editor, at the EDP, 20 August 1993. - Credit: Archant Library

He lived in Sheringham but retained the legacy of his father's interest in the history of Long Sutton through the publication of local books during his time in Norfolk. 

Tim Machin, chairman of the Long Sutton Civic Society, who installed the plaque, said: "We were disgusted as was everyone else I have spoken to. 


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"We found out at the beginning of May when one of the members was passing by but we did not report it was missing for a while as we wanted to check with the church authorities.

"We chose a plaque which looked good and would stand the test of time with tamper proof fixings to ensure it’s longevity. No such luck."

Cynthia Robinson and her son Mike with the newly installed plaque in 2019 which has recently been stolen from Long Sutton

Cynthia Robinson and her son Mike with the newly installed plaque in 2019 which has recently been stolen from Long Sutton - Credit: Long Sutton Civic Society

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The civic society intends to replace the bronze alloy plaque, which was worth £120.

Mr Machin said: "We will reinstall it in some form but we are conscious replacing it like-for-like could attract a recurrence for its nominal scrap value.

"The plaque was erected two years ago so it has not been there that long. Ironically, if it was still there now you would barely be able to see it because of the tree canopy. Back at the beginning of May there were only a few leaves on the tree." 

Mr Robinson authored more than 20 books on subjects including local history, walking, roads and tracks, and football.

It is believed the theft was a premeditated action as tools would have been required to remove the plaque, which was nailed to the tree. 

The plaque was unveiled in July 2019.

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