Happisburgh oldest resident reaches 100

MARY Jackson, believed to be Happisburgh's oldest resident, celebrated her 100th birthday with a party for family and friends at the weekend. Miss Jackson moved to the village 18 years ago to be near her nieces, Eiler and Karen Mellerup, after spending her working life in Birmingham where she had been a civil servant in the City Engineers' Department.

MARY Jackson, believed to be Happisburgh's oldest resident, celebrated her 100th birthday with a party for family and friends at the weekend.

Miss Jackson moved to the village 18 years ago to be near her nieces, Eiler and Karen Mellerup, after spending her working life in Birmingham where she had been a civil servant in the City Engineers' Department.

Born the youngest of four children in Staffordshire, Miss Jackson grew up in Hurley, Warwickshire, where her father was headmaster of the local school.

She remembers her parents selling their pony and trap shortly before moving to Birmingham.


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The family was eating lunch when they heard the clip-clopping of hooves outside and discovered that their pony Tommy had made his way back to them from his new owner's home.

A talented seamstress and knitter, Miss Jackson used to make clothes for herself and her young nieces. Her eyesight is still good and she enjoys doing crosswords and reading the newspaper.

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After retirement she took up walking long distances with one of her sisters and they would also visit the theatre regularly.

She was able to walk to Happisburgh Post Office until two years ago.

At one time Miss Jackson practised yoga and ate a healthy diet of only fresh fruit, salads, vegetables and chicken. Nowadays she has developed a taste for chocolate cake.

She still lives independently thanks to the support of her nieces. Eiler is curate for the coastal group of seven parishes which stretch from Bacton to Sea Palling, and Karen ran the Sandlerling Nursery School in Happisburgh until her retirement.

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