Grave concerns: Henry Blogg memorial in Cromer ‘being lost to a sea of weeds’

Concerns have been raised over the unkempt state of Henry Blogg's grave at the cemetery in Cromer. P

Concerns have been raised over the unkempt state of Henry Blogg's grave at the cemetery in Cromer. Picture: David Bale - Credit: Archant

He is the most decorated lifeboatman in RNLI history and served for 53 years on lifeboats in Cromer.

Coxswain Henry Blogg was a local man who became a national hero. Picture: Archant

Coxswain Henry Blogg was a local man who became a national hero. Picture: Archant - Credit: Archant

During his 38 years as coxswain, with the assistance of his crew, he carried out 387 rescues and helped to save 873 lives.

Henry Blogg, described as 'a local man who became a national hero', was awarded many honours, including three Gold and four Silver Medals from the RNLI, the George Cross for general war service and a British Empire Medal.

But concerns have been raised that his grave at Cromer cemetery is being lost to a sea of weeds.

Charlie Ayton, from Great Ellingham, whose grandmother is also buried at the cemetery, said: 'I was quite disgusted by the state of the grave. It was all in long grass and you can hardly see his name on it.


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'It's strange how Henry Blogg is so revered all over the town, but his grave is like this.

'I thought it would have been cared for better. Because of the 800-odd lives he saved the man deserves more.' And he added: 'I would be quite happy to spruce it up, if needed.'

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The RNLI museum in Cromer is named after Henry Blogg and a bust of the life-saving legend - which was previously vandalised - overlooks the North Sea from the town.

He is buried in a family plot at the Holt Road cemetery, which is maintained by Cromer Town Council.

John Lee, a local councillor and former chairman of North Norfolk District Council, is Mr Blogg's great-great-nephew. And he insisted one of Norfolk's greatest heroes wouldn't have wanted any fuss.

Councillor Lee said: 'He was my grandfather, Shrimp Davies' uncle, so he was my great-great uncle.

'People expect some kind of huge monument at the cemetery because of his fame, and because of the museum in the town and the bust. But he was a very unassuming man. He did not want some kind of vast monument on top of his grave.

'The last time it was cleaned, I think, was about three years ago, when myself, my wife and I did it. It's in the oldest part of the cemetery, so is not as well maintained as the newer part.

'The grave has been there more than 60 years. One stone was reset about 14 months ago as it failed a stress test, which the RNLI paid for.'

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