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Golf championship with a difference

PUBLISHED: 06:58 11 May 2009 | UPDATED: 09:41 13 July 2010

The “fairways” were just feet long, but the golf was just as tense as an open championship came to Norfolk - in scaled down form.

Top minigolf players from around Britain descended on a new course at Wroxham Barns yesterday as the county played host to the English open for the first time.

The “fairways” were just feet long, but the golf was just as tense as an open championship came to Norfolk - in scaled down form.

Top minigolf players from around Britain descended on a new course at Wroxham Barns yesterday as the county played host to the English open for the first time.

There were no soaring drives off the tee, or pin-point chip shots - but players used their skill and guile to tackle obstacles and carefully angle rebounds on the short but challenging holes.

Thirty seven players teed off for three rounds of 18 holes, including a smattering of locals seeking to pit their skills against the “pros.”

Competitors concentrated as they crouched over their putters, as a children's electric train wove among the concrete cows nearby.

The genteel quiet was punctuated by the occasional shout as someone sunk a hole in one.

Among the players were members of the British Minigolf Association team armed not with a bag of clubs but a pouch full of different balls to change between holes to suit conditions - along with notes made in practice.

But there were also novices simply having fun among the rebounds, rocks and water hazards.

With reigning champion Tim Davies from Hastings ruled out through injury, the title was up for grabs - and was won by Nick Chitty from Hornsey in north London with a total of 95, who set a new course record of 29 in landing his first major title, and edged out number one ranked Chris Harding from Birmingham by two shots.

The prize for the most number of holes in one went to Chris's 10-year-old son Matthew with 16.

Winner of a special trophy, created by resident sculptor Sue Windley, for the best local was 13-year-old Adam Kelly from Cambridge with 113. He also lifted the best novice award.


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