Go-ahead for Salvation Army citadel

Sheringham's Salvation Army citadel looks set to be rebuilt in a �1.3m development after planning councillors gave the go-ahead.Dating back to the movement's Victorian beginnings in the town, the building is considered out of date for modern needs.

Sheringham's Salvation Army citadel looks set to be rebuilt in a �1.3m development after planning councillors gave the go-ahead.

Dating back to the movement's Victorian beginnings in the town, the building is considered out of date for modern needs.

The plan has already gone back to the drawing board for a redesign after concerns about the scale of the building on Cremer Street.

Last week members of North Norfolk District Council's west area development control committee supported the plan nine votes to none.

Neighbour concerns including a lack of space for works vehicles, shortage of car parking, over development and the new building being too high and too big remained.

One complainant speaking at the meeting said the Salvation Army had been 'unchristian' in their dealings with their neighbours.

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Major Adrian Maddern, who runs the local HQ with wife Beth, said a larger hall did not mean an overnight increase in the number of people using it.

'We are just trying to make better use of the space we have got,' he explained.

The church has been a focal point of the community since the hall was built in the 1880s after Grimsby fishermen brought the Salvation Army to the town.

As well as its traditional services, and taking mission work to the street with a 20-strong band, the Army had also developed in recent years to include counselling and bereavement help. At the peak of summer its 180-strong hall could be full.

A further meeting between the Army's agent and highways experts would seek to resolve a separate problem about where the highway ended and whether the development would encroach on to land not belonging to the Army.

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