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Concerns over second phase of controversial housing estate

PUBLISHED: 08:48 05 March 2020 | UPDATED: 08:48 05 March 2020

Judith Ford and Dennis Willis protesting outside Hoveton village hall at the exhibition to discuss plans for more homes. Pictures: David Bale

Judith Ford and Dennis Willis protesting outside Hoveton village hall at the exhibition to discuss plans for more homes. Pictures: David Bale

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Concerns were raised by residents at an exhibition outlining plans for the second phase of a controversial housing estate.

An exhibition on plans for more homes was held at Hoveton village hall. Pictures: David BaleAn exhibition on plans for more homes was held at Hoveton village hall. Pictures: David Bale

The proposals comprise 150 homes plus 75 more for assisted living for older people on agricultural land east of Tunstead Road in Hoveton.

The first phase of the Brook Park development with 150 homes is nearly completed, and Hoveton Parish Council hosted a public exhibition on the proposed plans at the village hall on Wednesday, March 4. A public meeting will be held at the same venue on March 11.

Among those attending was Geoff Cook, who lives in Dilham Drive, who said: "I don't think the infrastructure is there to cope with it, whether you are talking about drainage or transport.

"There's a road through the planned estate, which does not make sense, and will just create a rat-run. The village is not designed for a large development like this.

The exhibition at Hoveton village hall to discuss plans for more homes. Pictures: David BaleThe exhibition at Hoveton village hall to discuss plans for more homes. Pictures: David Bale

"This is all farmland at present and, with Brexit, maybe we should be growing more now and not building on agricultural land?"

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Ken and Gillian Bacon, who live in Two Saints Close, only moved to the area last June and are trying to keep an open mind.

Mr Bacon said: "We understand that houses need to be built, but no-one wants them where they live."

Meanwhile, Mike Cable, who lives in Grange Close, said: "The last time we had torrential rain, we had sewage in our garden. I don't see how Hoveton can cope with more homes."

Peter and Ros Hawes, from Tunstead Road, said they are worried about the loss of a hedge and the pressure on services.

Meanwhile, Dennis Willis and Judith Ford were carrying out their own private protest. They said they had sewage in their garden following heavy rains.

Alison Cornish, senior planner for Persimmon Homes (Anglia) Ltd, said the need for housing for the elderly and more homes had been highlighted in North Norfolk District Council's emerging local plan.

She said the hedge would be replaced with new planting and added: "We plan to be on-site within a year of planning permission being granted. We would then be on-site for about three years."


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