Doubts raised over plan for sea eagles

A BIG question mark has been put against the plan for sea eagles to be reintroduced along the north Norfolk coastline.Both Natural England, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds and Anglian Water back the idea of reintroducing the magnificent birds along the coastline around Blakeney but the Country Landowners' Association said this week landowners and farmers were concerned about the way decisions concerning the proposed reintroduction of the white tailed birds.

A BIG question mark has been put against the plan for sea eagles to be reintroduced along the north Norfolk coastline.

Both Natural England, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds and Anglian Water back the idea of reintroducing the magnificent birds along the coastline around Blakeney but the Country Landowners' Association said this week landowners and farmers were concerned about the way decisions concerning the proposed reintroduction of the white tailed birds. were being made.

It is argued that tourism would receive a big boost from bringing back a species persecuted to extinction almost a century ago. But CLA president Henry Aubrey-Fletcher said this week: "Before any decision on whether sea eagles should be introduced is taken, there needs to be an informed discussion with key stakeholders at national level.

"All the ecological, social and environmental considerations have to be reflected on and a full scientific assessment made."


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He said association members were worried about the effect the proposed reintroduction would have on nature conservation, fisheries, shooting, livestock and tourism. There had been many reported cases of sea eagles taking young lambs in Scotland.

The CLA president added: "The impact of any reintroduction will inevitably be most keenly felt by those who own and manage the land, and it is their views and the implications for their businesses, which need to be given the greatest weight.

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"The CLA is also aware of concerns that there is a realistic possibility that the population, once established, will spread along both the coastline and the main watercourses, and have asked what is being to done to assess the extent of the area likely to be affected?

"There is significant concern about this project such that Natural England risk alienating the very people the organisation needs to implement its policies and ensure it reaches its targets, the farmers and landowners."

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