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WATCH: Stream gives bird’s-eye view of famous falcons Henry and Poppy

PUBLISHED: 11:19 14 April 2020 | UPDATED: 13:42 15 April 2020

The Cromer peregrine falcons with their 2020 clutch of eggs. Picture: Cromer Peregrine Project

The Cromer peregrine falcons with their 2020 clutch of eggs. Picture: Cromer Peregrine Project

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Nothing to watch on Netflix? No problem. You’re just a few clicks away from being able to watch a live-stream of two of Norfolk’s most famous residents.

One of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine ProjectOne of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine Project

A webcam set up at the top of Cromer Church’s tower is giving a ‘bird’s eye view’ into the nest of a pair of peregrine falcons which have been living there since early last year.

Chris Skipper, from the Cromer Peregrine Project, said the video feed was proving popular.

Mr Skipper said: “It only went online on Sunday [April 12] and in the first week it already had 30,000 views, so we’re really happy with that.

“People love it - especially at the moment, with everyone on lockdown. Instead of just doing nothing, they can now log in and watch the peregrines. I’ve even had people from Italy, Spain, Canada, Australia message me to say how good it is to see them online. It’s a feel-good story after all the bad news that’s around.”

One of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine ProjectOne of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine Project

Mr Skipper said the birds had been unofficially named Henry - after famous Cromer lifeboatman Henry Blogg - and Poppy - for the area’s poetic nickname, Poppyland.

A common sight on the live-stream currently is Poppy brooding - sitting on her three eggs, laid in the last week of March, to keep them warm.

Mr Skipper said the eggs should hatch around May 2.

He said there were actually three webcams up at the top of the church’s 160ft-tall tower, two which looked into the peregrines’ box and another that could be moved around remotely.

A view over Cromer from the top of the parish church - now the perch of a couple of peregrine falcons. Picture: Cromer Peregrine ProjectA view over Cromer from the top of the parish church - now the perch of a couple of peregrine falcons. Picture: Cromer Peregrine Project

After the falcons took up residency on the tower volunteers installed a box for them, and soon three chicks were hatched.

Project founding member Eddie Anderson said Cromer had “possibly one of the most accessible breeding peregrine pairs in the country”.

He said: “They’ve ignored the carnival, they’ve ignored the New Year fireworks and just got on with their lives and, for me, although what has happened is unfortunate, having these birds on our doorstep is a dream come true.”

All three survived their early months but sadly one died around the start of the year after flying into power lines near Holt. The other two have flown away to start their adult lives, leaving Poppy and Henry to work on their second Cromer clutch. Peregrines can reach speeds of more than 200mph during their hunting dive, called a stoop, making them the fastest members of the animal kingdom.

One of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine ProjectOne of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine Project

The Cromer peregrine which died on power lines pictured capturing a pigeon with its mother  in happier times.
Photo: CHRIS SKIPPERThe Cromer peregrine which died on power lines pictured capturing a pigeon with its mother in happier times. Photo: CHRIS SKIPPER

One of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine ProjectOne of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine Project

A view over Cromer from the top of the parish church - now the perch of a couple of peregrine falcons. Picture: Cromer Peregrine ProjectA view over Cromer from the top of the parish church - now the perch of a couple of peregrine falcons. Picture: Cromer Peregrine Project

One of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine ProjectOne of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine Project

Cromer Peregrine Project founder member Eddie Anderson and Hawk and Owl Trust urban peregrine project officer Zoe Bagherian-Koushkghazi helping install new cameras at the top of Cromer church tower.
Photo: CHRIS SKIPPERCromer Peregrine Project founder member Eddie Anderson and Hawk and Owl Trust urban peregrine project officer Zoe Bagherian-Koushkghazi helping install new cameras at the top of Cromer church tower. Photo: CHRIS SKIPPER

The three peregrine chicks at Cromer church last year. Picture: Chris SkipperThe three peregrine chicks at Cromer church last year. Picture: Chris Skipper

One of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine ProjectOne of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine Project

The Cromer peregrine falcons with their 2020 clutch of eggs. Picture: Cromer Peregrine ProjectThe Cromer peregrine falcons with their 2020 clutch of eggs. Picture: Cromer Peregrine Project

One of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine ProjectOne of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine Project

One of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine ProjectOne of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine Project

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One of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine ProjectOne of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine Project

One of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine ProjectOne of the Cromer peregrine falcons, as seen from a webcam at the top of the town's parish church. Image: Cromer Peregrine Project


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