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Medical equipment washed up in kitchen sink at 'Inadequate' care home

PUBLISHED: 15:20 26 November 2019 | UPDATED: 15:46 26 November 2019

Dunsland care home in Paston Road, Mundesley. Picture: Google StreetView

Dunsland care home in Paston Road, Mundesley. Picture: Google StreetView

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A Norfolk care home has once again been rated 'inadequate', six months after it was placed into special measures.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has published a report into Dunsland care home in Paston Road, Mundesley, following an unannounced inspection on October 17.

The health watchdog's report gave the home, which cares for up to 14 adults with learning disabilities, autism, physical and mental health care needs, 'inadequate' or 'requires improvement' grades in each of its five main categories.

The CQC said residents were not always supported by staff, the building was "not clean throughout" and leadership "remained a concern".

Among the observations CQC inspectors made were:

- A resident on a liquid diet was fed non-liquidised foods, leaving them at risk of chocking

- Another was left in a wheelchair throughout the inspection and measures were not in place to help them avoid pressure ulcers

- Residents had access to an unlocked laundry room which held cleaning chemicals, and a bedroom full of disused equipment, including ladders.

The report added: "We found equipment placed over toilets [which] prevented the toilet door from closing, impacting on people's privacy and dignity and posing a trip hazard".

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The report also noted Dunsland had a one-star food hygiene rating, medical equipment was being washed up in a kitchen sink and soiled laundry was not being properly cleaned.

Dunsland is managed by Ipswich-based Cephas Care. Rachael Robertson, Cephas' adult and community services director, said they were disappointed with the rating, but did not think it reflected improvements put in place since the previous inspection in May, which also resulted in an 'inadequate' grade.

Ms Robertson said: "We feel the report contradicted many aspects of the previous report to which we did challenge. Dunsland is a caring home and the best interests of the residents and staff are central to our action plan and the progression of the home.

"We acknowledge there is continuous improvement required and are working with the staff team at Dunsland and Norfolk County Council to ensure the progression of the standards of care and home improve in line with our action plan and CQC standards."

The CQC could close down the care home if it is rated inadequate at its next inspection, which is due within the next six months.

Dunsland's response in full

"Whilst we are naturally disappointed with the rating from CQC we do not agree the report reflects the home and the positive progression completed since the inspection in May and the many improvements in the standard of care and the building itself. We feel the report contradicted many aspects of the previous report to which we did challenge. Dunsland is a caring home and the best interests of the residents and staff are central to our action plan and the progression of the home.

"We acknowledge there is continuous improvement required and are working with the staff team at Dunsland and Norfolk County Council to ensure the progression of the standards of care and home improve in line with our action plan and CQC standards.

"We have and continue to invest in the staff teams learning, development and the building itself. We have a planned maintenance schedule which includes refurbishment to all communal and personal spaces within the home.

"We have arranged a meeting with CQC to discuss the inspection process and our action plans to progress the home further.

"In the new year we will be arranging an open day to invite the local community to visit Dunsland to promote the integration of Dunsland with the local community."

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