'Don't be scared to ask for help' - Charities ready to help vulnerable people in lockdown

Kelly Lindsay, founder of Friend in Deed charity.

Kelly Lindsay, founder of Friend in Deed charity. - Credit: Friend in Deed

Vulnerable people, families and anyone in need are being urged to seek help from charities during the latest lockdown.

Charities and community organisations are gearing up to boost support from delivering prescriptions and food parcels to vulnerable people, offer emotional support over the phone or online as well as activity ideas for parents.

Kelly Lindsay, founder of charity Friend in Deed,  which links up children with care home residents around Norfolk, said: "It is hard but we have to find positives. The more we collaborate the more positives we give to each other and the more chance we have to come out of this with a smile."

The former teacher, from Cawston, said it was important to support parents of school-age children which is why the charity will run projects where care home residents will create online quizzes for youngsters.

Daniel Williams, interim chief executive of Home-Start Norfolk.

Daniel Williams, interim chief executive of Home-Start Norfolk. - Credit: Home-Start Norfolk

Home-Start Norfolk, which helps parents or carers of pre-school children, is offering support over the phone and video technology and home-based activities.

Daniel Williams, Home-Start Norfolk interim director, said: "Please contact us. We have got pretty good at working to support people remotely."

Nikki Scott of Scotty's Little Soldiers.
Byline: Sonya Duncan
Copyright: Archant 2017

Nikki Scott of Scotty's Little Soldiers. Byline: Sonya Duncan Copyright: Archant 2017 - Credit: Sonya Duncan

Nikki Scott, founder of Scotty's Little Soldiers, which supports bereaved service children, and Simon Wright, chief executive of child bereavement charity Nelson's Journey, said the separate charities were running online support sessions for youngsters whose anxieties had increased throughout the pandemic.

Village and town support groups are also preparing for an increase in demand for prescription and food deliveries.

Tim Adams, one of the co-ordinators of Cromer Cares community group.

Tim Adams, one of the co-ordinators of Cromer Cares community group. - Credit: Tim Adams

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Tim Adams, one of the co-ordinators of Cromer Cares, said: "We are so lucky. We have had so many people step forward to offer assistance. We are prepared to do this."

Anna Green, a volunteer with Horsford Helpers, said: "We are going to be back in force. It has been humbling. I'm hoping people are not scared to ask for help."

And Lorraine Curston, founder of Sprowston-based domestic abuse charity Dawn's New Horizon, said it would continue to help people experiencing abuse, as well as delivering food parcels to survivors and one-to-one virtual counselling.

Lorraine Curston, founder of Dawn's New Horizon domestic abuse support charity.

Lorraine Curston, founder of Dawn's New Horizon domestic abuse support charity. - Credit: Neil Didsbury

She emphasised: "If you need to get out, get out."

Claire Cullens, chief executive of Norfolk Community Foundation.

Claire Cullens, chief executive of Norfolk Community Foundation. - Credit: Denise Bradley

Claire Cullens, chief executive of Norfolk Community Foundation, said: "Loss of income, isolation, lack of access to essential services and worries about health, mean that more and more people are in desperate need of help."





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