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Coastal erosion: MP seeks more action

PUBLISHED: 09:02 09 March 2009 | UPDATED: 09:29 13 July 2010

The MP for north Norfolk has warned more should be done to prevent coastal communities being submerged by the North Sea.

Norman Lamb's call to action comes as scientists prepare to meet in Denmark to announce that vast swathes of the coast and Broadland could be swamped by rising sea levels by 2100.

The MP for north Norfolk has warned more should be done to prevent coastal communities being submerged by the North Sea.

Norman Lamb's call to action comes as scientists prepare to meet in Denmark to announce that vast swathes of the coast and Broadland could be swamped by rising sea levels by 2100.

The global climate conference in Copenhagen this week will hear that the Broads is on an at risk list, which also includes The Thames, Hull, Holland, Florida and Bangladesh, due to melting ice caps leading to sea levels rising by 60cm by 2100.

Mr Lamb said the government had failed in its pledge to develop eco-friendly industry and technology to mitigate the effects of climate change and that funding should be set aside to compensate people who lose their businesses and homes due to flooding.

Mr Lamb said: “There are effective things that should be happening that can make a difference. It is frustrating that the government is failing to act.”

Meanwhile a fresh look at whether man-made reefs could be the answer to Norfolk's coastal erosion problems is being backed by local landowners.

Engineers are experimenting with models of a range of reef shapes and how they affect wave patterns.

But a linked number-crunching exercise, looking at how reef shapes and positioning impact on beach sand movement, has been backed by Norfolk's branch of the CLA country landowners association.

The aim is to see if reefs can be engineered to create the kind of stable sandy bays which exist between headlands.

Some rock reefs already exist off Sea Palling, but only nine of a planned 16 were completed after concerns of the impact further down the coast, which was being starved of a healthy flow of sediment.


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