Free cheese up for grabs - but you need to give it a name

Cheesemaker Arthur Betts of Ferndale has made a new cheese and it needs a name.

Cheesemaker Arthur Betts of Ferndale has made a new cheese and it needs a name. - Credit: Kate Wolstenholme

Can you think of a winning name for a Norfolk cheesemaker's new creation? There's a 3kg wheel of the stuff in it for you if you can.

Arthur Betts of Ferndale Farm in Little Barningham has asked for ideas about what to call his new creation, which goes well with pickles or on a slice of bread. 

Cheesemaker Arthur Betts of Ferndale has made a new cheese and it needs a name.

Cheesemaker Arthur Betts of Ferndale has made a new cheese and it needs a name. - Credit: Kate Wolstenholme

Mr Betts, 38, said: "We genuinely can't think of a good name for it. If anyone can think of a good idea for our cheese, we'd be happy to let them have one."

Ferndale is a family-run business which was set up by Mr Betts' mother around 15 years ago.

The new cheese joins their range including Norfolk Dapple - an unpasteurised, clothbound, hard cows’ milk variety - and Norfolk Tawny, a semi-hard beer-washed cheese made from raw milk.

Cheesemaker Arthur Betts of Ferndale has made a new cheese and it needs a name.

Cheesemaker Arthur Betts of Ferndale has made a new cheese and it needs a name. - Credit: Kate Wolstenholme

Mr Betts said he had wanted to create a new variety since he did a course with celebrated artisan cheesemaker Paul Thomas more than two years ago.

He said: "He's one of the best cheesemakers in the whole country. We wanted to use that newfound knowledge and make a new cheese, and then lockdown happened, and because of a lack of staff and customers we'd not had a reason to do it. 

Most Read

"But the thing about making a new cheese is you never know how it's going to turn out until you've made it - we only tried it ourselves two weeks ago."

Cheesemaker Arthur Betts of Ferndale has made a new cheese and it needs a name.

The new cheese made by cheesemaker Arthur Betts of Ferndale Farm. - Credit: Kate Wolstenholme

Ferndale's Norfolk Dapple is given four to six months to mature, but the new variety is a 'younger' cheese made to be eaten after about two months. Mr Betts said it was closer to a Cheshire or a Lancashire cheese than a cheddar.

He said: "It has a fresher, milkier flavour.

"It's more of a crumbly, table cheese and not so much of a chef's cheese. It's something to be eaten on its own, and is good as cheese and pickles, or for sandwiches. It's something just to be enjoyed for the pleasure of the cheese."

The cheese will be sold as 'The Cheese With No Name' from Saturday at Walsingham Farm Shop, Picnic Fayre in Cley, All Natural Company, Sheringham, Creake Abbey Food Hall and Star Plain Stores, Holt.

Cheesemaker Arthur Betts of Ferndale has made a new cheese and it needs a name.

Cheesemaker Arthur Betts of Ferndale has made a new cheese and it needs a name. - Credit: Kate Wolstenholme

*What do you think the cheese should be called? Add your suggestions to this story online or contact the farm directly on arthurferndalefarm@gmail.com or 01263 577 640.

Other Norfolk cheeses

Cheese-lovers in Norfolk don't have to look too hard to find locally-made varieties to tickle the taste buds. 

A range of hard and soft cheeses are made by small-scale producers around the county. 

These include:

- Binham Blue: More like a gorgonzola than a stilton, this cheese has a creamy texture and sweet, tangy flavour. It is produced by Mrs Temple’s Cheese, based at Copys Green Farm in Wighton.

Smoked Dapple cheese made by Ferndale.

Smoked Dapple cheese made by Ferndale. - Credit: Kate Wolstenholme

- Norfolk Mardler: A bright, white, creamy goats' cheese made by Sam Steggles of Fielding Cottage in Honingham. It is described as 'rich but not too goaty' and maintains a balance between sweet and savoury. 

- Norfolk White Lady: A soft, ewes' milk cheese made by Becky Enefer at Wilton Farm at Hockwold. It's perfect for anyone who is allergic to cows' milk. It is known for its tangy flavour and has been compared to brie. 

Cheeses maturing at Ferndale.

Cheeses maturing at Ferndale. - Credit: Kate Wolstenholme