Assurance over Mundesley clinic plan

A health care firm aiming to buy a problem-hit drug and alcohol treatment clinic in north Norfolk has reassured neighbours that it is not planning to bring in patients with higher grade problems.

A health care firm aiming to buy a problem-hit drug and alcohol treatment clinic in north Norfolk has reassured neighbours that it is not planning to bring in patients with higher grade problems.

The Diana Princess of Wales centre in the former Mundesley hospital has been up for sale after its parent charity Adapt hit financial problems and called in the administrators last July.

London-based company Baytree is poised to buy the centre, opened at a cost of �2m in 1997, to expand its range of mental health services.

But a local district councillor Graham Jones has called for a public meeting after community concerns about rumours the unit would be used for 70 addicts with mental health disorders such as schizophrenia and crack psychosis, whereas current clients 'do not generally have mental health problems.


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He was concerned about the safety of the local community and felt 'very strongly the local community should be consulted about this before any changes take place.'

Baytree managing director Chhagan Mistry said he was happy to have a meeting, but - with finalisation of the sale still weeks away - it was currently premature.

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However he assured the clinic would be run along the same lines as now, with no change to the business case or type of clientele, so no change of planning permission or care registration would be needed.

'There is no need for the local community or council to feel uneasy. It will be exactly the same as it is now, and a very important facility in the country which turns people's lives around,' he added.

Baytree was approached when an earlier top bidder pulled out, said Mr Mistry who stressed it was important to save the clinic because of the good work it did and lack of similar services elsewhere.

The company ran three centres in north London helping people to integrate back into life and the community after breakdowns and had sent some clients to Mundesley as more than half of mental health problem cases were related to drink and drug addiction.

Mr Mistry was keen to get the support of the local community for the centre through its friends support group and reviving its hosting of fetes.

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