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Broads village could get another 225 homes

Where the Brook Park II development would be built in Hoveton. Image: GoogeMaps

Where the Brook Park II development would be built in Hoveton. Image: GoogeMaps

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Plans for the second phase of a controversial housing development comprising another 225 homes have been lodged.

Street scene for phase 2 of Brook Park, Hoveton development. Picture: Persimmon HomesStreet scene for phase 2 of Brook Park, Hoveton development. Picture: Persimmon Homes

The proposal includes 150 homes plus 75 more for assisted living for elderly persons on agricultural land east of Tunstead Road in Hoveton, plus a link road with Stalham Road.

About 150 homes have already been built in phase one of the development at Brook Park, although the developer admits some work is still outstanding.

One resident, who did not wish to be named, said on social media: "This is going to be terrible for the area and the roads getting in and out of Wroxham."

Another resident added: "It's not about 'nimbyism'. It will have a massively negative impact on our already overstretched infrastructure, clog the roads up and affect our quality of life ."

Site of proposed major development off Tunstead Road in Hoveton. Picture: NNDC planning documentsSite of proposed major development off Tunstead Road in Hoveton. Picture: NNDC planning documents

Hoveton Parish Council is hosting a public exhibition on the plans at the village hall on Wednesday, March 4, from 2-8pm, and a public meeting will be held at the same venue on March 11.

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Parish council chairman Martin Richmond said: "It's a very controversial proposal. There is already a high level of dissatisfaction with phase one of the development."

District councillor Nigel Dixon said: "It's not just 150 homes. There are also the 75 supported living homes, so it's 225 homes in reality.

"There are also problems with the sewer network, traffic queues on the A1151 and concerns over doctors' surgeries."

A spokesman for developers Charles Church Anglia said: "This site is identified in the North Norfolk First Draft Local Plan as a preferred allocation, suitable to provide much-needed homes for the community.

"The transport assessment prepared in support of the planning application concludes the plans would not have a severe impact on the transport network. The proposed scheme includes improvements to the A1062/A1151/B1345 junction and a zebra crossing to provide a pedestrian link to St John's School."

A spokesperson added that a drainage strategy had been designed for the development.

If approved, builders would be on site within a year of permission being granted and the development would take two to three years to deliver.


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