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‘She’s an absolute delight and she’s our oldest tenant’ - 100-year-old celebrates in style

Pattie Knopp celebrates her 100th birthday at Lloyd Court at High Kelling. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Pattie Knopp celebrates her 100th birthday at Lloyd Court at High Kelling. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Copyright: Archant 2020

There cannot be too many 100-year-olds as sprightly and full of life as Pattie Knopp.

Pattie Knopp celebrates her 100th birthday at Lloyd Court at High Kelling, with her daughter Veronica Taylor, front; her son-in-law, Ian; Lloyd Court manager, Marie Quantrill, back centre, and deputy manager, Diana Youngman. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYPattie Knopp celebrates her 100th birthday at Lloyd Court at High Kelling, with her daughter Veronica Taylor, front; her son-in-law, Ian; Lloyd Court manager, Marie Quantrill, back centre, and deputy manager, Diana Youngman. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

The centenarian said that plenty of walking could be the secret to a long life, but she admitted it was probably just 'pot luck'.

She was born on March 13, 1920, and she celebrated her birthday at Lloyd Court care home in High Kelling on Friday, March 13.

She received a beautiful bouquet of flowers from relatives, a balloon, and a card from the Queen.

'I was born at midday, ready for dinner,' she quipped.

Born in Chelmsford, she came to Norfolk in 1972, living in Hockering, where she and her husband ran a post office and stores for about a decade.

They moved to Weybourne on the north Norfolk coast in 1982, and she moved to the care home in Cromer Road last December.

She said: 'I don't have any secret. None of my family lived to long ages, apart from my sisters.

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'It's just pot luck, I think. We were very well-fed as children. We ate spotted dick and treacle pudding then, which you can't eat now.

'We had seasons and played skippy, hoops, hopscotch, and we walked everywhere. I went to a church school and there were no school dinners then, so we also walked home at lunch-time. In the summers we played rounders.

'My father loved walking and every Sunday we would go out for walks. I had a very happy childhood. My father was a master builder. On our holidays we went to Galleywood and we had happy days there.

'We had freedom that children don't have now, which is a shame.'

She helped out with the teas at the North Norfolk Railway in Weybourne for about 10 years, where she made many friends, and was a keen bowls player.

The home's manager Marie Quantrill said: 'She's an absolute delight and she's our oldest tenant.'

Mrs Knopp, who is partially blind, said all the care home staff were lovely. 'I'm happy here,' she added.

She had three daughters but the middle one tragically died in her 40s. She has four grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.


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