North Norfolk stately home on sale for £3.5 million

Irmingland Hall, near Corpusty in north Norfolk, has gone up for sale.

Irmingland Hall, near Corpusty in north Norfolk, has gone up for sale. - Credit: Supplied by Savills

In its heyday it was among Norfolk's grandest stately homes, with quirks including its own lake, cockpit, chapel and chaplain. 

It is even said that one of Oliver Cromwell's daughters once owned Irmingland Hall, which is just outside the village of Corpusty in north Norfolk. 

Now the six-bedroom, four-bathroom Grade-II listed home could be yours, if you have a spare £3.5 million. 

Irmingland Hall, which sits on 5.6 acres by the River Bure, has gone on the market.

Irmingland Hall, near Corpusty in north Norfolk, has gone up for sale.

Irmingland Hall, near Corpusty in north Norfolk, has gone up for sale. - Credit: Supplied by Savills

Ben Rivett, partner from Norwich-based Savills, said: "The most impressive thing about this house is really the location.

"Unless you have a particular reason to use the road, which many don't, you wouldn't know about this house. It's very special."

Irmingland Hall was built in 1609 by Sir Nathaniel Bacon for his wife.

A drawing room inside Irmingland Hall.

A drawing room inside Irmingland Hall. - Credit: Supplied by Savills

Most Read

Sir Nathaniel was one of the most accomplished amateur painters of his time and came from a distinguished family - the politician and philosopher Sir Francis Bacon was a relation. 

The house was originally in an H-shape, but everything but the north wing - the existing building - was pulled down in 1788.

There were extensive renovations in the 1920s. 

Irmingland Hall, near Corpusty in north Norfolk, has gone up for sale.

Irmingland Hall, near Corpusty in north Norfolk, has gone up for sale. - Credit: Supplied by Savills

A staircase inside Irmingland Hall.

A staircase inside Irmingland Hall. - Credit: Supplied by Savills

The garden room inside Irmingland Hall.

The garden room inside Irmingland Hall. - Credit: Supplied by Savills